Herringbone backsplash

Lately I’ve been thinking a lot about my kitchen. It’s where I spend a ton of time so I want it to be a place that I feel happy in. And for the most part, I am happy in my kitchen. I love the big island in the middle where my kids eat their breakfast and draw pictures of dinosaurs with three heads. And I like having a big farmhouse table to eat at as a family or when we have friends over for dinner. Overall I think the layout works well for me but yet it still felt like a few tweaks might bring it closer to what I would choose in a kitchen that I designed.

Kitchen_3

I initially thought that maybe I should paint all the wall cabinets white and change out the backsplash. Problem was, I had a hard time coming to grips with painting cabinets that look nice and are of really good quality. Plus what if they looked like crap painted white? No going back after that decision. So painting the cabinets was out and I moved on to the idea of new backsplash. Here’s what the backsplash looked like before:
093013_1293
Just a natural stone, kind of boring backsplash. Certainly not bad, but also nothing that drew your eye in. To help make the backsplash more special, I headed down to Everitt and Schilling Design to check out their selection of tiles. It was here that I saw the herringbone tile that I knew I had to have.

E & S tile herringbone pattern

E & S tile herringbone pattern

And then I found out that this tile comes in a whitewash finish! I was sold. I hoped that changing the backsplash to a lighter color might help the kitchen feel brighter. Also, the backsplash in the kitchen is directly across from my reclaimed wood wall so bringing in these reclaimed tiles for the backsplash would help tie the two rooms together. Ready to see that change?

101613_1312
101613_1309

herringbone backsplash_Suburban Bitches herringbone backsplash_Suburban Bitches

I love that the tiles aren’t stark white and still have some brown and black tones in them to tie into the cabinets and countertop. And the herringbone pattern is way more fun that the previous backsplash! I’ve got one other idea for the kitchen to help brighten it up but I’ll save that to surprise y’all once I’ve got it done. Here’s a before and after for all of you:

Before and after_kitchen backsplash

Before and after_kitchen backsplash

Little changes like these are a great way to make a kitchen your own. And E & S tile has a huge selection of wood tiles that would all look great as a backsplash. Remember this backsplash from Barb’s kitchen?

E & S tile backsplash_Collins pattern in gunstock

E & S tile backsplash_Collins pattern in gunstock

Check back on Friday for a super exciting announcement here on the blog! Believe me, you don’t want to miss this one!!!

Related posts:

It's an Oregon kind of weekend
7 things you didn't know about the Bitches
Raise your forks {overnight oats}
48 hours in Portland
Posted on
This entry was posted in Erin’s house, HIO, HT-Erin's House, Recent Posts and tagged , , .
     

17 Responses to Herringbone backsplash

  1. Berta says:

    Erin:
    Your kitchen was already beautiful…. but I love the new look. :)

  2. erin says:

    o.m.g. gorgeous!

  3. Pingback: Centsational Girl » Blog Archive » BOTB 10.25.13

  4. Angie M. says:

    Holy cow! That tile is gorgeous. Thanks for sharing.

  5. Cheryl says:

    Love that tile. Would love to borrow the idea but wondered what is the fire rating for behind a cook top?

    • Erin says:

      Hi Cheryl,
      While I don’t know the exact fire rating on the tiles, I do know that they are safe to put behind a cook top. They coat the tiles with a ceramic coating so they can then go behind a cook top. I can find out more info if you like with the exact specifications on the coating. Just let me know.

  6. Anne says:

    Wow, that has such a tremendous impact! Beautiful and very sophisticated choice!

  7. Karen H says:

    I have been looking for just the right back splash for a LONG time…. and I think I may have just found it! Honestly, I love it…. but it will also depend on the cost.

    I have a question… is the tile actually wood? Or it is tile made to look like reclaimed barnwood? Either way, it is gorgeous! And I love the whitewashed look. It would tie in beautifully with my white cabinets and stainless steel appliances!

    Really nice job! :)

    • Erin says:

      Hi Karen,
      The tile is actual wood, made from barns in Colorado. It is a gorgeous product that is eco-friendly too! As for cost, I don’t remember the exact cost per sq foot. I want to say somewhere around $25-30 a sq foot. If you want I can pass along your email address to the owner of the company and have a sample sent to you and they can give you exact price per sq ft.

  8. Tiffany says:

    Hi there, I am very much interested in the white wash herringbone back splash! It’s just the kind of character I am looking to add in my new construction home.
    I seen that you posted you could pass along an email address and get a sample sent out.. Could you do this for me?! Love it!! Thanks a bunch in advance.
    Tkarleszko2@gmail.com

  9. ColorHelp says:

    Love the look. I can’t believe what a big change that one element made.

    Just a thought for those concerned with durability/cleanability – I wonder if you couldn’t achieve a similar feel using the new porcelain tiles made to look like wood planks? It wouldn’t be as authentic, but it would be cheaper…and tougher, if those factors are imperative for you.

    • Erin says:

      The tiles are covered with a ceramic coating so I haven’t had any cleanability issues yet. And since they are made from wood that has weathered really rough elements outside for years I think the durability is pretty darn good. You could use the porcelain tiles that look like wood but the ones I have seen don’t have the scale that would be right for a backsplash. And you would lose all the dimension you get with this product and the real wood.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>